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August 24, 2010 Published in Courts & Crime, Other News

Deputy Chief Hassan Aden Inducted Into Evidence-Based Policing Hall Of Fame

David Weisburd, Director of the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy, with Evidence-Based Hall of Fame inductee, Hassan Aden of the Alexandria (VA) Police Department. (Courtesy Photo: Creative Services of GMU)

David Weisburd, Director of the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy, with Evidence-Based Hall of Fame inductee, Hassan Aden of the Alexandria (VA) Police Department. (Courtesy Photo: Creative Services of GMU)

On August 11, Deputy Chief Hassan Aden was inducted into the Evidence-Based Policing Hall of Fame. The Hall recognizes innovative law enforcement practitioners who have been central to the implementation of a high quality research program in their affiliated agency, highlighting individual excellence in both using and conducting policing research.

Deputy Chief Aden has been instrumental in the support and implementation of a randomized controlled experiment in license plate recognition systems at hot spots conducted by George Mason University. This experiment is a replication of the Police Executive Research Forum’s License Plate Reader Experiments with an added component of a random-sample community survey gauging community concerns with the technology. In 2006 he helped introduce and deploy a number of LPR systems in patrol, and was key in working with the George Mason University team to implement this experiment, being involved from the ground up in assuring that implementation was carried out.

Many of the patrol officers remark on Deputy Chief’s Aden’s hands-on mentorship approach, which makes him highly successful in incorporating innovative and difficult research and field experiments in daily police practices. Most notably, Deputy Chief Aden transformed his patrol sector when he was a district commander from a reactive beat patrol approach to a directed hot spots approach using the Koper Curve principal. Given that very few (if any) other agencies in the U.S. have transitioned their traditional beat patrol system to a directed hot spots approach, this change is viewed as one of the most innovative in modern policing.