Print Print
December 15, 2014 Published in Schools

ACPS Hosts Delegation From Mexico City And U.S. Green Building Council

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponShare on TumblrTweet about this on Twitter
The rooftop observatory at Jefferson-Houston from (L to R): Mark Eisenhour from ACPS Education Facilities; Priscilla Gomez, Ivan Francois Cruz Navarette and Rocio Torres from the Instituto Thomas Jefferson in Mexico City; and VMDO Architects Sara Teaster and Bob Moje (Courtesy Photo)

The rooftop observatory at Jefferson-Houston from (L to R): Mark Eisenhour from ACPS Education Facilities; Priscilla Gomez, Ivan Francois Cruz Navarette and Rocio Torres from the Instituto Thomas Jefferson in Mexico City; and VMDO Architects Sara Teaster and Bob Moje (Courtesy Photo)

A delegation from the Instituto Thomas Jefferson in Mexico City toured the new Jefferson-Houston School this week as part of their research on developing green schools in Mexico. The tour was organized by Nathaniel Allen from the U.S. Green Building Council, based in Washington, D.C. The Green Building Council wanted to highlight pioneering examples of environmentally friendly workspaces in the D.C. metro area to their Mexican counterparts.

The group was shown around Jefferson-Houston by Mark Eisenhour from ACPS Educational Facilities and VMDO Architects, Sara Teaster and Bob Moje who designed Jefferson-Houston.“I was very impressed with the school. It had a very good vibe and I know our friends from the Instituto Thomas Jefferson also enjoyed being shown around,” said Allen.

The delegation shared information about their work in Mexico City and took note of the green features of the new school such as the rainwater harvesting system and polished concrete floors.Jefferson-Houston is a model for green technology. It has a rainwater harvesting system that channels rainwater that lands on the school’s roof into a cistern that is used to supply toilets and irrigation systems. It also has a high efficiency gas system, which means it is extremely economical to heat and cool the building.

Jefferson-Houston was designed with light louvers and rooftop light tubes that reflect daylight deep into the interior of the building. Daylight harvesting controls also allow artificial lighting to be turned off automatically when daylight levels exceed minimum thresholds. The school building also uses local materials such as native hardwoods stones such as Buckingham Slate and Alberene Soapstone.

 

Comments are closed.